Brian Cashman nixes Gleyber Torres trade t Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey alk

NEW YORK — Brian Cashman has a reputation as a daredevil among baseball’s general managers, having spent some of his free time over the past few years dangling off the sides of high-rise office towers, jumping twice out of a military aircraft and walking the edge of Toronto’s CN Tower, 116 stories above street level.

And even he shudders to think of the public outcry if the Yankees considered trading Gleyber Torres.

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NEW YORK — Brian Cashman has a reputation as a daredevil among baseball’s general managers, having spent some of his free time over the past few years dangling off the sides of high-rise office towers, jumping twice out of a military aircraft and walking the edge of Toronto’s CN Tower, 116 stories above street level.

And even he shudders to think of the public outcry if the Yankees considered trading Gleyber Torres.

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“No! Come on now,” Cashman said on Friday, an eyebrow raised in incredulity. “I’ve got to walk around this city.”

Torres may have been declared off-limits, but with managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner stating this week that the Yankees should have payroll flexibility to add a starting pitcher and still remain under the luxury tax threshold, Cashman’s search for the right fit is underway.

Cashman estimated that he has touched base with 20 of the other 29 clubs since the conclusion of the MLB Draft, and is waiting to hear back from some counterparts so that they can exchange interest levels on certain players. Pitching is the priority, especially in the wake of injuries to Masahiro Tanaka and Jordan Montgomery.

“Hopefully we can get Tanaka back in a timely manner, and it would be nice to improve things at the same time,” Cashman said. “This team deserves the right to get reinforced here, if we can possibly find a way. But we really like the team we’ve got and we’d love to make it better if it’s possible.”

The Yankees have  Jimmy Graham Jersey been linked to various targets in recent weeks, including Michael Fulmer of the Tigers, Cole Hamels of the Rangers, J.A. Happ of the Blue Jays and Tyson Ross of the Padres, as well as some longer shots like Madison Bumgarner of the Giants and the Mets’ Jacob deGrom.

When swapping proposals with rival clubs, Cashman has the benefit of a strong farm system that has several players clawing to return to the big league level, including infielder Brandon Drury and outfielder Clint Frazier, who are currently stashed at Triple-A.

“We’ve got a few of them now,” Cashman said. “There’s no doubt, Clint Frazier down there would be crushing it up here, whether it be for us or somewhere else. Brandon Drury doesn’t belong there. We just sent a guy down yesterday that wasn’t easy after the game in Tyler Austin.

“You tell them to try not to let this affect how you go about your business because that will just make things worse while you go through it. See what happens. Force your way back up here, wait for the injury to hit. We tell people also at the same time, they’re playing for 29 other clubs. It works out one way or the other.”

Roster shuffle
To add right-hander Jonathan Loaisiga to the active roster, the Yankees optioned Austin to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Austin had been selected to stay on the roster under a similar roster crunch last month, with utility man Ronald Torreyes going to the Minors instead.

“I think with Toe, he just gives us more flexibility,” manager Aaron Boone said. “We were seeing Tyler’s playing time kind of diminish,  HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey and with [Neil Walker] we kind of have that protection; if we want to give [Greg] Bird a day off, we’ve got Walk there. So especially when we have 13 pitchers, to have three first basemen, it’s probably not the best perfect roster construction.

“We just felt like at that time, Tyler had really earned the right to be on this team with the production he had given us the first six, eight weeks. But we were finding the at-bats weren’t there. I think it’s best for us and for him to go down there and hopefully get back into regular playing time, regular at-bats to eventually become an option for us again.”

Minor move
The Yankees traded right-hander Chad Whitmer to the Milwaukee Brewers on Friday in exchange for international signing bonus pool money.

A 10th-round Draft pick in 2017 from Southern Illinois, the 23-year-old Whitmer was 3-0 with a 3.79 ERA in 14 Gulf Coast League appearances last season, striking out 22 against two walks in 19 innings.

This date in Yankees history
June 15, 1923: A 19-year-old Lou Gehrig made his Major League debut, entering a 10-0 victory over the Browns as a defensive replacement at first base.

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.


New York Yankees,
Gleyber Torres

Brewers’ Zack Brow Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey n leads top prospects

Here’s MLB Pipeline’s roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

Here’s MLB Pipeline’s roundup of the top prospect performances in the Minor Leagues on Friday.

:: Complete prospect coverage ::

Zack Brown fell one out short of throwing a no-hitter, but still went the distance as he recorded the first complete ga Jimmy Graham Jersey me and shutout of his career in Double-A Biloxi’s 5-0 win over Mississippi.

The Brewers’ No. 23 prospect kept the M-Braves off the bas Men’s Nike Green Bay Packers Ha Ha Clinton Dix Elite Team Color Jersey Cheap epaths for the first seven innings before an error by Biloxi right fielder Trent Grisham to open the eighth inning ended Brown’s chance at a perfect game. He rebounded to set down the next three batters in order, and then retired the first two batters in the ninth before allowing a single on a soft fly ball to center field with two outs.

Brown would get the next and final Mississippi batter to ground out to shortstop to seal his one-hit shutout. He struck out eight and matched his season-high mark by throwing 109 pitches (71 strikes) in the outing.

Tabbed by Brewers club officials as a potential breakout candidate heading into 2018, Brown has done just that.

Assigned to Double-A to open the season, even though he made just four Class A Advanced Carolina starts in 2017, Brown — a 2016 fifth-round pick out of the University of Kentucky — has  Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale been anything but overmatched in the Southern League. In addition to his perfect 6-0 record in 14 starts, the 23-year-old right-hander leads the qualified hurlers in the circuit in both WH HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey IP (1.00) and innings pitched (85 1/3) and ranks third in ERA (tied, 2.53) and strikeouts (84). Opposing hitters, meanwhile, are batting just .204 against him.

Brown has been especially sharp over his last four starts, pitching to a 1.33 ERA with 32 strikeouts and just 13 hits allowed in 27 innings.

The rest of the best performances from top prospects Friday

No. 5 overall prospect Nick Senzel (Reds’ No. 1) has collected multiple hits in six straight games after finishing 2-for-5 with a double in Triple-A Louisville’s 5-2 win over Toledo. The 22-year-old infielder has 14 hits and a .500 average (14-for-28) in that span, during which he’s boosted his overall average from .256 to .302.

• No. 14 overall prospect Kyle Tucker (Astros’ No. 2) cleared the bases with a double as he recorded three hits for the third time in five games for Triple-A Fresno. The 21-year-old outfielder finished 3-for-5 at the plate, also stealing two bases in the contest. Tucker is quietly putting up big numbers in his first Triple-A campaign, as his latest performance gives him a .288/.359/.484 batting line with nine home runs, 20 doubles, 52 RBIs and 10 steals through 61 games.

Tucker doubles in three

• No. 18 overall prospect Royce Lewis (Twins’ No. 1) collected three run-scoring hits as he matched his season high with four RBIs in Class A Cedar Rapids’ 14-2 win over Peoria. The 2017 No. 1 overall pick connected on a first-inning solo homer and later added a pair of RBI singles to finish 3-for-5. It was the third multihit performance in four games for Lewis, who’s slashing .298/.342/.454 with six homers, 16 doubles and 16 steals through 54 games in his first full season.

Lewis hits a solo blast

• No. 42 overall prospect Adrian Morejon (Padres’ No. 6) was a bat-missing machine as he recorded 12 of his 18 outs via the strikeout in a strong outing for Class A Advanced Lake Elsinore. The dozen strikeouts marked a career high for the Morejon, who ultimately allowed two earned runs on three hits and a walk in the outing. The 19-year-old lefty owns a 3.59 ERA with 64 strikeouts in 57 2/3 innings this season and has now struck out at least seven batters while completing at least six frames in three straight starts.

A’s No. 7 prospect Austin Beck extended his hitting streak to eight games with his second four-hit game of the season for Class A Beloit. He finished 4-for-5 at the plate, tallying a double, three runs scored and two RBIs in Beloit’s 9-2 win over Clinton. With one home run in 57 games this season, Beck hasn’t yet tapped into the robust raw power that in part made him the No. 6 overall pick in last year’s Draft. The good news, however, is that the 19-year-old outfielder is hitting for average (.298/.339/.368), while keeping his strikeouts in check (56 K’s in 57 games).

• After being reinstated from the disabled list earlier in the day, Nationals No. 13 prospect Luis Reyes contributed on both sides of the ball to help Double-A Harrisburg blank Richmond, 3-0. The 23-year-old righty impressed on the mound by allowing four hits and four walks with three strikeouts in six scoreless innings, and he also helped his cause at the plate by delivering a solo home run in the fifth inning while also reaching once via a walk. The homer was Reyes’ first career hit and came in his eighth pro at-bat.

Orioles No. 29 prospect Ryan McKenna stayed red hot by tallying an extra-base hit in both ends of Class A Advanced Frederick’s doubleheader against Down East. He fared particularly well in the nightcap, going 2-for-4 with his eighth home run after hitting a double as part of a 1-for-3 showing in the opener. The 21-year-old’s .374 average through 66 games this season is tops in the Carolina League and ranks second in the Minors behind Vladimir Guerrero Jr. McKenna also leads the Carolina League in OBP (.466), slugging (.557), hits (95), total bases (141) and runs scored (59).

Yankees No. 9 prospect Dillon Tate scattered four hits and two walks and racked up a season-best 10 strikeouts over 6 1/3 scoreless innings in a no-decision for Double-A Trenton. The 24-year-old righty has permitted more than two earned runs once in his past seven starts, during which he’s lowered his season ERA from 5.24 to 3.11. He’s compiled 62 strikeouts and 16 walks and held hitters to a paltry .214 average in 66 2/3 innings (12 starts) this season.

Tate’s 10th strikeout

Yankees No. 10 prospect Matt Sauer was unhittable over six innings in his season debut for Class A Short Season Staten Island. The 2017 second-rounder faced the minimum in the performance, issuing one walk and striking out three while throwing 49 of his 75 pitches for strikes. It was the seventh career start for 19-year-old righty after he posted a 5.40 ERA over 11 2/3 innings (six starts) last year in his pro debut.

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero.

Didi Gregorius homers for third Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey HR in 3 games

NEW YORK — Didi Gregorius‘ power stroke has returned, as the shortstop homered for the third time in his past three games on Friday, helping the Yankees to a 5-0 victory over the Rays at Yankee Stadium.

Gregorius connected for a solo home run off former teamma Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale te Nathan Eovaldi in the third inning, project HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey ed to travel 391 feet to the second deck in right field, according to Statcast™. It was Gregorius’ 14th long ball of the season, coming off a two-homer performance on Tuesday against the Nationals, and part of a three-hit night.

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 Jimmy Graham Jersey 

NEW YORK — Didi Gregorius‘ power stroke has returned, as the shortstop homered for the third time in his past three games on Friday, helping the Yankees to a 5-0 victory over the Rays at Yankee Stadium.

Grego Men’s Nike Green Bay Packers Ha Ha Clinton Dix Elite Team Color Jersey Cheap rius connected for a solo home run off former teammate Nathan Eovaldi in the third inning, projected to travel 391 feet to the second deck in right field, according to Statcast™. It was Gregorius’ 14th long ball of the season, coming off a two-homer performance on Tuesday against the Nationals, and part of a three-hit night.

Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey iew Full Game Coverage


“Nothing at all [is different]. Everything has been the same,” Gregorius said. “The thing is, they’re finally falling. That’s the only thing I can say.”

Video: TB@NYY: Loaisiga, Didi, Sanchez lift Yanks over Rays

The American League Player of the Month for April, Gregorius opened the year red-hot, batting .327/.421/.735 with eight doubles, a triple, 10 homers and 30 RBIs prior to May 1.

He slumped in May, batting .151/.186/.215 with a homer and five RBIs, but has looked more like himself of late, batting .333 (18-for-54) in his past 14 games.

“I just feel like he’s getting back into a strong position more consistently now,” manager Aaron Boone said. “He’s kind of rocking back with that little tap that he’s got. I feel like he’s in a really strong position to really impact the ball. I feel like he’s laying off some pitches more so than he was before.

“We’ve seen some walks here in the past week and I think he’s getting a little more comfortable. But I think it starts with he’s getting into a strong position to do some damage and impact that ball more consistently.”

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.


New York Yankees,
Didi Gregorius

Yankees hosting O Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey ld-Timers Day on Father’s Day

NEW YORK — On Father’s Day this Sunday, Yankees fans will be invited to enjoy a doublehead HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey er of favorites from the franchise’s past and present, as the 72nd annual Old-Timers’ Day will be played before the series finale against the Rays.

Many familiar faces will appear at Yankee Stadium, including Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson and Whitey Ford, plus YES Network broadcasters David Cone, Paul O’Neill and John Flaherty. This year’s game will also feature a handful of relative newcomers, as Andy Pettitte, Jason Giambi, Nick Swisher, Dion James and manager Aaron Boone are scheduled to make their Old-Timers’ Day debuts.

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NEW YORK — On Father’s Day this Sunday, Yankees fans will be invited to enjoy a doubleheader of favorites from the franchise’s past and present, as the 72nd annual Old-Timers’ Day will be played before the series finale against the Rays.

Many familiar faces will appear at Yankee Stadium, including Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson and Whitey Ford, plus YES Network broadcasters David Cone, Paul O’Neill and John Flaherty. This year’s game will also feature a handful of relative newcomers, as Andy Pettitte, Jas Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey on Giambi, Nick Swisher, Dion James and manager Aaron Boone are scheduled to make their Old-Timers’ Day debuts.

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Pettitte, Giambi and Swisher will be the “young” old-timers playing on Sunday, as their Major League careers ended in 2013, ’14 and ’15, respectively. James last donned the pinstripes during the Yankees’ World Series Championship run in 1996, and Boone finished his playing career with Houston in ’09.

Joining the Hall of Famers and former Yankees on the field will be the widows of five legendary Yankees — Arlene Howard, widow of Elston Howard; Helen Hunter, widow of Jim “Catfish” Hunter; Jill Martin, widow of Billy Martin; Diana Munson, widow of Thurman Munson; and Kay Murcer, widow of Bobby Murcer.

Not only is this event memorable for those in attendance, who will watch their favorites take the field another time, but it’s also something that the former Bombers are looking forward to.

Video: Standout Seasons 2002: Jason Giambi

“The best thing about it, I think, is when you’re able to come back to Yankee Stadium with the rest of the great Yankees and be a part of it,” Jackson said last year. “It’s a good feeling.”

Fans are asked to be in their seats by 11:30 a.m. ET for introductions, with the Old-Timers’ Game to follow. All pregame festivities will be aired exclusively on YES Network. All gates will open to ticket-holding fans at 10 a.m.

The Yankees will then host the Tampa Bay Rays at 2:05 p.m., wearing a blue ribbon on their uniforms along with blue wristbands as part of a league-wide effort to raise awareness about prostate cancer and raise funds for research to fight the disease.

Video: CLE@NYY Gm3: Reggie Jackson throws first pitch

Fans can also root a little bit harder for home runs to be hit this weekend, as the annual Prostate Cancer Foundation “Home Run Challenge” gives spectators the chance to make a one-time monetary donation or pledge for every home run hit by their favorite MLB Clubs; the challenge began on June 1, and it runs through Father’s Day on Sunday. Every dollar donated through the Home Run Challenge goes to the Prostate Cancer Foundation to fund critical research to defeat prostate cancer.

Here is the full roster of former Yankees expected to attend Old-Timers’ Day:

Jesse Barfield
Ron Blomberg
Brian Boehringer
Aaron Boone
Jim Bouton
Scott Bradley
Dr. Bobby Brown
Homer Bush
David Cone
Johnny Damon
Ron Davis
Bucky Dent
Al Downing
Brian Doyle
Mariano Duncan
John Flaherty
Whitey Ford
Jason Giambi
Ron Guidry
Charlie Hayes
Reggie Jackson
Dion James
Jay Johnstone
Scott Kamieniecki
Don Larsen
Graeme Lloyd
Hector Lopez
Lee Mazzilli
Ramiro Mendoza
Gene Monahan (trainer)
Jeff Nelson
Paul O’Neill
Andy Pettitte
Lou Piniella
Willie Randolph
Bobby Richardson
Mickey Rivers
Nick Swisher
Frank Tepedino
Marcus Thames
Roy White

Mandy Bell is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York.


New York Yankees

Giancarlo Stanton new A-Rod for Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey Yankees fans

They don’t love Giancarlo Stanton yet at Yankee Stadium, and maybe not ever. They don’t dislike him, even though there have been the times when they’ve booed him — most notably when he struck out five times at the Yankees’ home opener, a day when the weather made fans even more cranky than Stanton did. They never loved Alex Rodriguez, either — another 50-homer guy who brought a tape-measure contract of his own to Yankee Stadium and then signed a bigger one later.

The fans don’t boo Stanton as much lately. My friend Pete Caldera, the fine baseball writer for northjersey.com, said on Wednesday night that when Stanton makes an out in a big spot, “it’s more like groans.” Stanton was cheered on Wednesday night when he got hits his first three times up — one a scorched RBI single right by Nationals’ third baseman Anthony Rendon. By the end of the Yankees’ 5-4 loss to Washington, Stanton’s batting average was up to .248, to go with his 15 home runs — just three fewer than Aaron Judge — and 35 RBIs, on the team with the best winning percentage in the sport.

They don’t love Giancarlo Stanton yet at Yankee Stadium, and maybe not ever. They don’t dislike him, even though there have been the times when they’ve booed him — most notably when he struck out five times at the Yankees’ home opener, a day when the weather made fans even more cranky than Stanton did. They never loved Alex Rodriguez, either — another 50-homer guy who brought a tape-measure contract of his own to Yankee Stadium and then signed a bigger one later.

The fans don’t boo Stanton as much lately. My friend Pete Caldera, the fine baseball writer for northjersey.com, said on Wednesday night that when Stanton makes an out in a big spot, “it’s more like groans.” Stanton was cheered on Wednesday night when he got hits his first three times up — one a scorched RBI single right by Nationals’ third baseman Anthony Rendon. By the end of the Yankees’ 5-4 loss to Washington, Stanton’s batting average was up to .248, to go with his 15 home runs — just three fewer than Aaron Judge — and 35  HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey RBIs, on the team with the best winning percentage in the sport.

Video: NYY@NYM: Stanton smashes a solo big fly to left

But to say that Yankees fans are keeping Stanton at arm’s length is an understatement about the same size as he is. These fans love Judge. More than anybody, Judge is the player they come to see, the at-bat they want to watch, even if Stanton hit more home runs last season for somebody else. On Wednesday night, the place rose up for All Rise when he seemed to hit one out to left-center in the fourth and ended up denting the top of the wall instead. They remembered that sw Men’s Nike Green Bay Packers Ha Ha Clinton Dix Elite Team Color Jersey Cheap ing, and the home run that their 21-year old second base star, Gleyber Torres, hit later.

Yankees fans even went home talking about the Nationals’ gifted teenager, Juan Soto, who hit two home runs on this night. The first was a bit of a surprise, finally dropping out of the sky and into the first row of the stands in left-center. The second was the one to remember, a Judge-like shot over the Yankees’ bullpen in right-center, projected to be 436 feet.

So the teenaged kid had made history. They always love history at the Stadium. Yankees fans love Judge. They love Yankees kids like Torres and Miguel Andujar already. They are theirs. Stanton isn’t and — again — might never be. There was alway Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey s a lot of that going on with Reggie Jackson. Roger Maris was never Mickey Mantle. Alex Rodriguez was never going to be Derek Jeter.

There is never any real science on ballpark polling, any real good analytics on why a ballpark or a fan base reacts this way or that way to a star athlete. Kevin Durant has now won two straight MVPs in the NBA Finals. Warriors fans are always going to love Steph Curry more. He came first. They won with him first. The Yankees didn’t win it all last year with Judge. But he sure gave them a ride.

I walked around the Stadium on Wednesday night and talked to fans about Stanton. And the best explanation I got about the reaction to him so far, came from Lance Gordon, lifelong Yankees fan, Woodbury, N.Y., in Sec. 118 with his family.

“The only way I can explain it is that we’ve got too much Judge in us,” Gordon said. “[Judge] just swept us all away last season.”

In the first game of the season, Stanton hit two home runs. And you know what the coverage was? That he and Judge were going to hit 100 home runs between them and opposing pitchers were going to have to be threatened with bodily harm to even come out of the clubhouse. This was going to be Mant Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale le and Maris and 1961, when the two of them chased Babe Ruth’s 60 and ended up with 115 homers between them.

Stanton is on a pace to finish with 46 home runs in a home run park in a home run time. That may be exactly who he is. It may turn out that last season was an outlier season for him in Miami. He was healthy enough to play 159 games, and he clubbed those 59 home runs. He’d only played 150 games once in his career before that. The most homers he had previously hit in a season was 37.

Stanton was great in Miami last year. He’s not in Miami any longer. And they better get used to him in New York. He’s the one with A-Rod’s contract now. He’s not going anywhere. In so many ways, because of the size of the contract and his numbers last year and the size of him, Stanton remains one of the most interesting guys in the world — just not the way we thought. It’s too early to judge how this season will work out for him, of course. But not for this: He’s not Judge on 161st St. Not theirs, at least not there.

Mike Lupica is a columnist for MLB.com and the New York Daily News and is a best-selling author.


New York Yankees,
Giancarlo Stanton

Jonatha Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey n Loaisiga wins MLB debut with Yankees

NEW YORK — Jonathan Loaisiga‘s unflappable demeanor helped him power through a loaded Yankees farm system, a quality the organization believed would serve him well at the highest level. Eyeing the Nicaraguan flags that dotted Yankee Stadium’s seating area prior to his first pitch, the right-hander soothed his nerves by doing what got him to this point, filling the strike zone with a fastball.

Loaisiga may not possess the lengthy track record that other top prospects have compiled, but he continued to impress on Friday, making up for any relative inexperience by dripping with confidence and poise. Loaisiga struck out six over five scoreless innings, picking up the victory in his Major League debut as the Yankees defeated the Rays, 5-0, at Yankee Stadium.

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NEW YORK — Jonathan Loaisiga‘s unflappable demeanor helped him power through a loaded Yankees farm system, a quality the organization believed would serve him well at the highest level. Eyeing the Nicaraguan flags that dotted Yankee Stadium’s seating area prior to his first pitch, the right-hander soothed his nerves by doing what got him to this point, filling the strike zone with a fastball.

Loaisiga may not possess the lengthy track record that other top prospects have compiled, but he continued to impress on Friday, making up for any relative inexperience by dripping with confidence and poise. Loaisiga struck out six over five scoreless innings, picking up the victory in his Major League debut as the Yankees defeated the Rays, 5-0, at Yankee Stadium.

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“It has definitely been a tough road to get here,” Loaisiga said through an interpreter. “I felt super excited. Getting to your goal, achieving your goal; it’s a dream to pitch in the big leagues. Having the opportunity to do that and finally pitch in the big leagues is a dream come true.”

Rated as the Yankees’ No. 12 prospect by MLB Pipeline, the 23-year-old Loaisiga was the 15th Nicaraguan to appear in a big league game and the first Yankee. With his family huddling to watch every pitch on the internet from Managua, Loaisiga allowed three hits and issued four walks in a 91-pitch performance.

Video: TB@NYY: Gregorius belts a solo homer to right

The effort was supported by a third-inning homer from Didi Gregorius, who recalled playing two games behind Loaisiga last year while he served a Minor League rehab assignment with Class A Advanced Tampa.

“He attacked the zone, kept the hitters off balance, and nothing has changed for him,” Gregorius said. “That shows you that he has a plan how to attack guys already. It shows you he has a really big heart and loves the game. He pitched like he was already here.”

Gregorius hit his 14th homer — and third in his past three games — off former teammate Nathan Eovaldi, who also allowed a Giancarlo Stanton sacrifice fly before working into the eighth. Eovaldi left a bases-loaded jam for Jonny Venters, who surrendered a three-run Gary Sanchez double that broke the game open and snapped an 0-for-17 skid for the Bombers’ backstop.

Video: TB@NYY: Sanchez doubles to right, clears the bases

“It definitely felt great,” Sanchez said through an interpreter. “It’s been a while since I’ve been able to contribute on the offensive side. Hopefully from now on, good things will come.”

Manager Aaron Boone said he sensed Loaisiga was fatigued by a tough fourth inning, but he still was able to Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey  get through five frames to qualify for the win. He impressed the opponents as well; Rays manager Kevin Cash said that at one point, bench coach Charlie Montoyo compared Loaisiga to a young Mariano Rivera.

“Hopefully, he doesn’t develop a cutter or anything,” Cash said. “A talented young kid. He was very poised. The walks were sprinkled in there, but the stuff — wow. What do you do against a young pitcher making his debut? It doesn’t matter when you have that type of stuff. You are able to throw it at will.”

Video: TB@NYY: Loaisiga on debut, Sanchez on clutch at-bat

Loaisiga will remain in the rotation as a placeholder while the club waits for Masahiro Tanaka to return from what is expected to be a month-long stint on the disabled list.

“For a first time out, I thought he competed really well and obviously he gave us everything we needed tonight,” Boone said. “If I could’ve drawn it up, if he could’ve gotten us through five innings and to leave with a lead like that not giving up any runs, I would definitely have signed up for that.”

Jonathan Holder, David Robertson, Dellin Betances and A Men’s Nike Green Bay Packers Ha Ha Clinton Dix Elite Team Color Jersey Cheap dam Warren combined for four scoreless innings of one-hit relief, completing the Yanks’ fifth shutout of the season. New York has won 12 of its past 15 contests, while Tampa Bay lost for the 1 Jimmy Graham Jersey 1th time in 15 games, including eight consecutive losses on the road.

Video: TB@NYY: Loaisiga, Didi, Sanchez lift Yanks over Rays

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
The Rays’ greatest threat came in the fourth inning, as they loaded the bases against Loaisiga via two singles and a walk. That drew pitching coach Larry Rothschild to the mound for a visit, and after a brief chat, Loaisiga struck out Christian Arroyo swinging in a five-pitch at-bat to pin all three runners aboard.

“He told me to breathe, take it easy, slow it down and execute one pitch at a time,” Loaisiga said. “Just throw the ball the way you know how to. … It’s something I’ve developed over the years, being able to stay calm in tough situations. I think it’s a key in the game of baseball, to stay calm and do your job.”

Video: TB@NYY: Loaisiga fans Arroyo, leaves the bases loaded

SOUND SMART
Loaisiga is the seventh Yankees pitcher since 1908 to record at least five scoreless innings in his first career game, and only the fifth Yankees starting pitcher to do so. Loaisiga joined Sam Militello (Aug. 9, 1992, vs. Boston) as the only pitcher — starter or reliever — to do so since 1943.

UP NEXT
The Yankees continue their series with the Rays on Saturday at 1:05 p.m. ET, when right-hander Luis Severino (9-2, 2.27 ERA) will make his 15th start of the season. Severino has been excellent at Yankee Stadium, where his 1.79 home ERA is the third-lowest in the American League. Right-hander Ryne Stanek (1-1, 2.76) was announced as the starter for a Tampa Bay bullpen day.

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale  him on Twitter @bryanhoch and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.


New York Yankees,
Jonathan Loaisiga

Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey AL East players who are primed for turnaround

BALTIMORE — It isn’t quite the knee-jerk panic of a slow April, but with baseball past it’s quarter pole and rounding the corner to the midway point, there’s a lot of players who need to kick their finish into high Jimmy Graham Jersey  gear.

At the top of the American League East, there’s a race between Boston and New York that shows no signs of not going down to the wire, making a resurgence from a slumping player on either — or both — clubs all the more intriguing. For Toronto, Tampa Bay and Baltimore, there are still plenty of candidates for a second-half surge, whether it’s a big-name pending free agent or an established veteran playing nowhere near his track record.

BALTIMORE — It isn’t quite the knee-jerk panic of a slow April, but with baseball past it’s quarter pole and rounding the corner to the midway point, there’s a lot of players who need to kick their finish into high gear.

At the top of the American League East, there’s a race between Boston and New York that shows no signs of not going down to the wire, making a resurgence from a slumping player on either — or both — clubs all the more intriguing. For Toronto, Tampa Bay and Baltimore, there are still plenty of candidates for a second-half surge, whether it’s a big-name pending free agent or an established veteran playing nowhere near his track record.

Here are five players who are prime candidates to turn things around after a slow start.

Video: TOR@CLE: Donaldson’s 2nd HR of doubleheader

Blue Jays: Josh Donaldson
Injuries have played a major role, but nobody expected Donaldson to be sitting on five home runs and 16 RBIs in the middle of June. Donaldson missed three weeks in April with a shoulder issue and he’s currently on the disabled list with a calf injury, but when the three-time All-Star has been on the field, he has managed to post just a 0.6 WAR in 36 games. Donaldson is expected to return soon and there’s a strong chance he will be shopped at the non-waiver Trade Deadline, but the 2015 AL MVP Award winner will need a return to form to build up appropriate value.

Orioles: Chris Davis
Davis is in the middle of a three-day layoff as the O’s hope the first baseman can clear his head. After leading the Major Leagues in home runs twice in three years, Davis has 86 strikeouts and batting .150 with four homers and 15 RBIs. He’s also signed to a record deal that includes four more years. Baltimore’s priority is getting the slugger right, for this season and beyond.

Video: TB@SEA: Gomez clobbers a solo homer to left field

Rays: Carlos Gomez
Gomez hit .182 in March, .172 in April and .232 in May, and he has tallied seven home runs and 14 RBIs on the season. While there’s not much comforting about that, Rays fans can take heart in looking at the back of his baseball card. Gom Men’s Nike Green Bay Packers Ha Ha Clinton Dix Elite Team Color Jersey Cheap ez’s career numbers suggest he should snap out of his funk soon. He owns a career .253/.312/.415 line in 12 Major League seasons.

Red Sox: Jackie Bradley Jr.
A notoriously streaky hitter, Bradley has started this season with the wrong kind of streak. His batting average has been below .200 for all but two days since April 30. Bradley, who belted 26 homers in 2016 and 17 last year, has also been almost silent in the power department. He is still an elite defender in center field, so the Red Sox just need adequacy and not excellence from Bradley to justify his spot in the lineup. There have been numerous times in Bradley’s career he has followed epic cold streaks with prolonged hot streaks. Boston hopes history will repeat itself.

Video: NYY@KC: Sanchez lines a solo home run to left field

Yankees: Gary Sanchez
Sanchez was benched for the past two games because of his slump, as the backstop hit .075 (4-for-53) with just one extra-base hit and 18 strikeouts in the 15 games prior. His slash line has fallen to .190/.291/.430 with 12 homers and 35 RBIs in 55 games; last year, he hit .283/.369/.507 with 13 homers and 40 RBIs through his first 55 games. Sanchez has refused to use injuries as an excuse for his woes though perhaps there’s something to be said f HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey or a little rest.

“Maybe I’m overthinking a little bit too much,” Sanchez told reporters on Tuesday. “Maybe that’s why I’m missing those pitches I usually don’t miss. I’m sure that I’m going to get through this.”

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Follo Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale w her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast.


New York Yankees,
Toronto Blue Jays,
Boston Red Sox,
Baltimore Orioles,
Tampa Bay Rays,
Chris Davis,
Josh Donaldson,
Carlos Gomez,
Jackie Bradley Jr.,
Gary Sanchez

Remem Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey bering Ron Guidry’s amazing 1978 season

The 1978 season was filled with so many peaks and valleys for the Yankees, who gave new meaning to the words “Bronx Zoo.”

Throughout the chaos, one man stood out as a beacon of consistency for a team in desperate need of stability, putting together one of the greatest seasons any starting pitcher has ever had.

The 1978 season was filled with so many peaks and valleys for the Yankees, who gave new meaning to the words “Bronx Zoo.”

Throughout the chaos, one man stood out as a beacon of consistency for a team in desperate need of stability, putting together one of the greatest seasons any starting pitcher has ever had.

Ron Guidry.

The lanky left-hander went 25-3 with a 1.74 ERA in 35 starts, unanimously winning the American League Cy Young Award. His dominance on the mound helped the Yankees mount a memorable second-half comeback, erasing a 14-game deficit in the AL East to force a one-game, winner-take-all matchup against the rival Red Sox.

Naturally, Guidry — nicknamed “Gator” or “Louisiana Lightning” — started that game at Fenway Park, doing his part to get the Yankees back to the postseason to defend their World Series title.

“There were so many things going on during that season,” Guidry said. “In 1977 and 1978, there was a lot of turmoil in those years. I just felt like I needed to do a good job whenever I went out there, because of the way the season progressed.”

The peak of that 1978 season arguably came on June 17, when Guidry set a Yankees record (that still stands) with 18 strikeouts in a 4-0 shutout of the Angels. The club is honoring the 40th anniversary of that game (and season) tonight, by giving away Guidry bobbleheads. Four decades later, Guidry recounts his magical season as if it just ended last week. The ease with which he recalls each game, each batter, is impressive, though the 67-year-old laughs at the mention of his remarkable memory.

“You guys talk about it all the time,” Guidry said. “I’m not able to forget it; you guys keep reminding me about it!”

As good as Guidry was in 1978, the seeds of that season were planted the previous summer. Manager Billy Martin moved Guidry from the bullpen into the rotation in mid-May 1977 — a role that immediately suited the southpaw.

Guidry had his ups and downs during his first three months after the move, but he went on a seven-start streak during the final part of the season that saw him go 7-0 with a 1.02 ERA, five complete games and three shutouts.

Two complete-game victories in three postseason starts — including a gem in the World Series to help the Yankees win their first title since 1962 — was the icing on top for Guidry, who finished the season 16-7 with a rotation-best 2.82 ERA in his rookie season.

“You’ve learned how to become that No. 1 starter, so when you start the next season, you pitch as the No. 1 starter,” Guidry said. “Everything reverts back to the year before. I was still thinking the same way in ’78 about how it wound up in ’77.”

Guidry picked up right where he left off when 1978 started, going 7-0 with a 1.88 ERA through the end of May. Thanks largely to Guidry’s efforts, the Yankees were hanging around the top of the division.

Those numbers improved to 10-0, and by mid-June, it was obvious that Guidry was having a special season. Still, nobody could have foreseen what would take place in his next outing.

Guidry established a new franchise record with his 18-strikeout performance against the Angels, twirling his third consecutive complete game and his fifth in six starts.

“That was the first game all year that I actually thought I didn’t have anything,” Guidry said. “When I left the bullpen, I asked Sparky [Lyle], ‘When was the earliest you’ve ever been in a game? I don’t have very much.’ He said, ‘Just keep battling. You’re too good for it not to come at some point. I’m not planning to go in until the ninth inning — if I go in at all.'”

Video: CAL@NYY: Ron Guidry’s 18-strikeout performance

Lyle knew what he was talking about. Guidry had 11 strikeouts through five innings, delighting the crowd. As the night went on, fans began standing every time he got two strikes on a batter, encouraging their pitcher to get another punchout. He responded time and time again, fanning three more Angels in the sixth and one each in the seventh and eighth. Little did Guidry know that a tradition was born on that historic night.

“I’m the one that started all that stuff,” Guidry said. “When I was actually pitching, it was more of a distant roar, because you learn to tune all of that out. When you’re tuned into something else, you don’t really pay attention to whatever is going on. I would think about the batter; what I’m going to throw, how I pitched him the last time. I had so many things in my mind, I didn’t listen to what was going on around me.”

Guidry had a chance to tie Nolan Ryan’s AL record of 19 strikeouts, but after he fanned the first two hitters in the ninth, he gave up a single to Don Baylor before retiring Ron Jackson on a grounder to end the game.

“Pitchers throw pitches over the plate and try to make the best pitches they can; hitters are guessing,” Guidry said. “Every time I’d throw a pitch right down the middle, they would take it. When I’d throw one away from the plate, they would swing. Every time they would guess, they guessed wrong.”

Guidry’s starts had essentially become automatic wins, but the Yankees struggled on the other days. Despite a 15-1 record in Guidry’s first 16 starts, the team finished June at 43-32; when anyone besides Guidry started a game, the Yankees were 28-31.

“For me, being the No. 1 guy on the staff, I’m just trying to do the best job that I can do every time I go out there, because I know how much the team depended on me,” Guidry said. “As you’re going through the season, it’s just magnified. Reporters were telling me, ‘You’ve probably already locked up the Cy Young Award.’ I was like, ‘Dude, we’ve got three more months to go.'”

One of the Yankees’ biggest problems was supposed to have been one of their greatest strengths.

Despite the presence of Lyle, the 1977 AL Cy Young Award winner, in the bullpen, the Yankees signed Rich “Goose” Gossage as a free agent, adding the most imposing reliever in the game to their staff.

But Gossage had five blown saves and seven losses out of the bullpen by the end of June, causing some teammates to lose trust in the big right-hander.

“Billy Martin came out one night to check and see how I was doing,” Guidry said. “I was winning, 2-1, Goose is warming up in the bullpen, and before Billy said a word, I looked at him and said, ‘I’m telling you right now, if you take me out of this game and you bring that guy into this game, the next time I pitch, I’m going to throw one pitch and fake an injury. Until he starts getting guys out, I’ll finish my own games.'”

Who could blame him?

It wasn’t until July 7 that Guidry finally took his first loss of the season, a 6-0 clunker in Milwaukee.

“You don’t mind losing those, because there’s nothing you could have done that day that would have made it different. You just got your butt beat,” Guidry said. “The next game I lost [on Aug. 4], I lost, 2-1, to Baltimore; that’s the one that haunts me. I think about that one often. I was up, 1-0, going into the seventh inning and gave up a two-run homer to Doug DeCinces, who hit me well. That’s the game you think about.”

Guidry was the ultimate stopper; after taking the mound on Opening Day, 22 of his 34 subsequent starts came on the heels of a Yankees loss. The Yankees were 19-3 in those games — a key reason the club was able to overcome the 14-game deficit it faced in mid-July.

“For the team, every time that I’d take the mound, they would look at me knowing we were going to win,” Guidry said. “They knew all they had to do was score one or two runs and the game was over, because that’s how well I was pitching. I never thought about what I was actually doing in terms of me having a great year; it was about the impact I was having on my team.”

The Yankees seized sole possession of first place on Sept. 13, and they remained there until the final day of the season. But when the 162-game schedule was over, the Yanks and Red Sox were tied at 99-63, sending the rivals to a one-game battle for the division title. Guidry, who was 24-3 with a 1.72 ERA, would take the ball with the season on the line.

Video: NYY@BOS: Guidry gets 25th win of season

“A lot of guys have said it was the most nerve-wracking game they had ever played in,” Guidry said. “I never at any moment of the day felt like the world would end if we didn’t win. I went out with the same philosophy as always: do the best job that I can do.”

Boston scored against Guidry in the second and sixth innings, taking a 2-0 lead into the seventh. Bucky Dent’s two-out, three-run homer gave the Yankees a lead — part of a four-run seventh that sent Guidry back to the hill with a two-run cushion.

“They were going to have to score off me or Goose to win that game,” Guidry said.

Guidry handed the ball to Gossage with one out in the seventh, then Reggie Jackson’s solo shot in the eighth stretched the lead to three runs. The Red Sox scored twice against Gossage in the bottom of that inning, but the future Hall of Famer closed it out in the ninth, retiring fellow Cooperstown inductees Jim Rice and Carl Yastrzemski with the tying run in scoring position.

Guidry was credited with the win, his 25th, capping one of the best seasons any pitcher has had in the modern era.

The Yankees would successfully defend their title, beating the Royals in four games in the best-of-five AL Championship Series before dispatching the Dodgers in six games for the second straight year to capture another World Series.

Guidry pitched 10 more seasons with the Yankees, finishing his career with a 170-91 record, a 3.29 ERA, four All-Star appearances and two World Series rings. His numbers fell short of Cooperstown consideration, but his No. 49 was retired by the Yankees in 2003 — the ultimate honor in the Bronx.

Video: Yankees Retired Number: No. 49, Ron Guidry

Guidry spent two years (2006-07) as the Yankees’ pitching coach under Joe  Jimmy Graham Jersey Torre, and although he wasn’t brought back when Joe Girardi took over in ’08, “Gator” remains a staple of the team’s Spring Training as a guest instructor. Forty years after the greatest year of his career, Guidry still enjoys hearing his teammates talk about that season. It’s not an ego thing for the lefty; he truly seems to appreciate what his performances meant to the entire team that year, especially when he hears it from the men with whom he shared a field.

“I’ve always been most happy when the guys that I played with tell stories about what it was like playing behind me,” Guidry said. “Someone once asked Mickey Rivers what it was like playing behind me. He said, ‘I don’t know why I ever bring my glove out there.’

“Hearing your teammates tell you what they thought about you, that’s rewarding.”

Mark Feinsand, executive reporter for MLB.com, has covered the Yankees and MLB since 2001 for the New York Daily News and MLB.com.


New York Yankees

Jonathan Loaisiga joins Yankees for Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey MLB debut

NEW YORK — Jonathan Loaisiga did not say much during his time in Yankees camp this spring, opting to keep a low profile and listen to the more experienced players as much as possible. Even so, the right-hander managed to be noticed by the coaching staff, making an impression with his excellent stuff and a simp Jimmy Graham Jersey le athletic delivery.

That fluid form and a stellar array of Minor League statistics convinced the Yankees that the 23-year-old will be capable of jumping from Double-A to the Major Leagues as he prepares to make his debut on Friday against the Rays at Yankee Stadium.

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NEW YORK — Jonathan Loaisiga did not say much during his time in Yankees camp this spring, opting to keep a low profile and listen to the more experienced players as much as possible. Even so, the right-hander managed to be noticed by the coaching staff, making an impression with his excellent stuff and a simple athletic delivery.

That fluid form and a stellar array of Minor League statistics convinced the Yankees that the 23-year-old will be capable of jumping from Double-A to the Major Leagues as he prepares to make his debut on Friday against the Rays at Yankee Stadium.

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“There’s just an easy way about him,” manager Aaron Boone said. “I think he’s really talented. I think he’s going to be a really good pitcher in this league. I think there’s a presence about him. There’s a humility that he walks around with, but I also believe that there’s a confidence that he’s unaffected by anything going on around him.”

The Yankees optioned first baseman Tyler Austin to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to clear a roster spot for Loaisiga.

Loaisiga (pronounced “loh-AYE-see-gah”) combined to make 10 starts this season with Class A Advanced Tampa and Double-A Trenton, going 6-1 with a 3.00 ERA. In 45 innings, the 5-foot-11, 165-pound Loaisiga has walked just four batters while striking out 58, scattering 47 hits. He has touched 98 mph and brings a solid curveball and changeup.

“It’s been a tough road for me to get here,” Loaisiga said through an interpreter. “Now it’s about enjoying this moment and enjoying the opportunity. I want to do the best I can for the team and focus on winning. Winning is everything for us.”

Born in Managua, Loaisiga will be the 15th Nicaragua-born player (11th pitcher) in big league history, and the first Yankee. Boone said Loaisiga — the Yanks’ No. 12 prospect, per MLB Pipeline — is replacing the injured Masahiro Tanaka on a start-to-start basis.

“I think a big reason why he’s the guy that we chose is we feel like his stuff is excellent, but I feel like his delivery is low-maintenance enough that it should allow him to step up here and be representative right away,” Boone said.

Added to the 40-man roster this offseason, the Yankees nearly promoted Loaisiga to start in a makeup doubleheader at Detroit this month before a pair of postponements in Baltimore shuffled the rotation.

“I was just focused on doing my job in Double-A, focused on doing my job and helping that team,” Loaisiga said. “The manager [Jay Bell] called me into his office and told me that a big opportunity was coming for me and I was going to be able to pitch here in the big leagues.”

Originally signed by the Giants in September 2012, Loaisiga was released in May 2015 after injuries limited him to 13 starts in two-plus seasons. Inked by the Yankees in February 2016, Loaisiga required Tommy John surgery after one start for Class A Charleston.

The Yankees rehabbed the hurler, and their patience is being rewarded. He returned to the mound last June, going 1-1 with a 1.38 ERA in 11 starts at three lower levels of the farm system.

“I’m super excited,” Loaisiga said. “This is a great opportunity the Yankees have given me. I’m excited and thankful for that. Thank God that I’m here.”

In the swing
Gary Sanchez returned to the Yankees’ lineup in the cleanup spot on Thursday following two games off. Boone had benched Sanchez for the Interleague series against the Nationals, saying that his catcher could use the rest as he deals with physical issues, including a sore right calf. Sanchez had 10 hits in his past 69 at-bats (.145) at the time.

“I think he’s a little bit frustrated and upset that he’s not dominating, which is to be expected,” Boone said. “I feel like he’s pressed a little bit where he’s chasing the result and he’s chasing the hits, which I feel like is frankly normal whe HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey n a hitter struggles a little bit. I don’t think there’s a confidence issue.”

 Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey Injury report
Tanaka was sent home on Wednesday with an inner ear infection, and head athletic trainer Steve Donohue advised the hurler — already on the DL with strains of both hamstrings — not to come to the ballpark on Thursday. Boone said Tanaka is expected to be in the clubhouse on Friday, and that the issue is not expected to delay his return to the mound.

This date in Yankees history
June 14, 1953: The Yankees swept a doubleheader from the Indians by scores of 6-2 and 3-0 in Cleveland. The Game 2 win was the Yanks’ 18th straight victory and 15th straight road win, the latter mark establishing a franchise record that still stands today.

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and Facebook, and listen to his podcast.


New York Yankees,
Jonathan Loaisiga

HOPE Week takes Jimmy Graham Packers Jersey Yankees to FDNY reunion

NEW YORK — Imagine living over 1,100 miles away from the one place you call home. For 87-year-old Sal Reale, this has been a reality for over 40 years.

After serving two years in the U.S. Army as a radio operator in Germany during the Korean War, Reale was a New York firefighter at multiple firehouses throughout the city for more than 20 years. At the end of his service in 1977, Reale and his wife moved their family to the St. Petersburg, Fla., area, never coming back to visit his former firehouses.

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NEW YORK — Imagine living over 1,100 miles away from the one place you call home. For 87-year-old Sal Reale, this has been a reality for over 40 years.

After serving two years in the U.S. Army as a radio operator in Germany during the Korean War, Reale was a New York firefighter at multiple firehouses throughout the city for more than 20 years. At the end of his service in 1977, Reale and his wife moved their family to the St. Petersburg, Fla., area, never coming back to visit his former firehouses.

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As Reale continued to age, the last wish on his bucket list was to come home to FDNY Ladder 136. Now living in a nursing home, he knew he did not have the funds to fulfill his wish.

Enter the Wish of a Lifetime organization.

Founded by former U.S. skier Jeremy Bloom in 2008, the Denver-based organization’s mission is to shift the way society views and values our oldest generations  HaHa Clinton Dix Jersey by fulfilling seniors’ dreams and sharing stories to inspire those of all ages.

Reale was selected to have his wish granted after filling out a questionnaire for Wish of a Lifetime that detailed his love for the Yankees and his dream to come back home one final time.

“Our program is open to anyone over the age of 65 in the U.S.,” executive director of Wish of a Lifetime Tom Wagenlander said. “Once we get an application, we do a number of interviews to make sure this is something they can’t do on their own and something that’s going to be really life-enriching and fulfilling.”

Reale knew that he was going to visit his old stomping grounds, but had no idea that Wish of a Lifetime had reached out to his favorite baseball team to make his afternoon one that he would never forget.

“The Yankees had become aware of us, I think, about a year ago and said, ‘We’d love to work with you all. Let us know when there’s a wish that fits,'” Wagenlander said. “Sal is just the perf Jimmy Graham Jersey ect fit. He is the consummate New Yorker, a huge Yankees f Ha Ha Clinton Dix Jersey For Sale an, a former firefighter. So we reached out to the Yankees earlier this year and they said, ‘We want to feature you guys at HOPE Week,’ and here we are. This is more than we could’ve ever imagined.”

Video: TB@NYY: Yankees join FDNY reunion during HOPE Week

Reale arrived to the firehouse Thursday afternoon and was greeted by the current firemen of Ladder 136. As Reale stepped through the door, they said, “Welcome home.” After looking around the room for a few minutes and partaking in the unit’s traditional “roll call,” Reale said, “I am home.”

“I still feel like these guys are my brothers,” Reale said of the firemen who were in attendance on Thursday.

Although it didn’t seem like Reale’s day could get any better, it was about to. As part of the Yankees’ HOPE Week celebrations, Greg Bird, Chasen Shreve, Chad Green, Tyler Austin, Jonathan Holder and Adam Warren came out of the back room of the firehouse to surprise the former firefighter.

Tweet from @Yankees: #HOPEWeek Day 4: Today, the Yankees honored @wishofalifetime, which grants senior citizens dreams from their bucket lists. Earlier, we joined 87-year-old Sal Reale, in visiting his old firehouse where he shared stories with current @FDNY Ladder 136 members. pic.twitter.com/u6QuGhqUIs

“This is awesome,” Reale said. “I figured I’d walk in with my son or something and have a meet and greet with the guys who were on duty. I was thinking of ordering sandwiches in if they would allow me to jo Green Bay Packers Jimmy Graham Jersey in them in the meal, but then the Yankees did it.”

After shaking all of the players’ hands, Reale dove right into storytelling, never afraid to say exactly what was on his mind.

“This is great. He’s hilarious,” Bird said prior to lunch. “I would love to pick his brain and get some stories. I’m sure he’s got some good ones. I need to get him fired up more. I need to get him going. I’ve been trying to stir the pot a little bit more with him.”

Getting Reale stirred up was not a difficult challenge. Bird sat down beside the former firefighter for lunch and remained there the rest of the afternoon, talking about his time watching Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio play baseball and old firehouse stories as each of the other players rotated in and out of the conversation.

“This guy’s watched guys play baseball for the Yankees for 80-something years, man,” Austin said. “He’s seen a lot of stuff and hopefully we can bring another championship back for him this year. It’s great to get a chance to talk to him and hear some of his stories.”

The players walked with Reale and the current Ladder 136 firefighters around a fire truck, learning about each of its parts. With Austin clearly showing extreme interest in being a firefighter, he was the first to take the step of trading in the pinstripes for the fire gear.

The first baseman put on the pants and boots before receiving a jacket, helmet and gloves. The firemen then outfitted him with all of the required equipment.

Shreve, Green, Holder and Warren followed Austin’s lead and put on fire suits of their own. Each of them took turns participating in practice drills like pulling another firefighter out of a building. With the players in the fire gear, they joined Sal for a few group photos before heading back to the Stadium.

“These guys are heroes,” Austin said. “They save people’s lives every single day. For me to be able to come in here and give them a break from having to work and to bring some joy to Sal and these guys, it truly brings joy to me to be able to come in here and be able to hang out with these guys. It’s an honor to come in here.”

Although the event was over, Reale’s day was just beginning. His son, grandson and Wagenlander joined him at Yankee Stadium for a pregame tour that included a quick stop at manager Aaron Boone’s news conference to fulfill a dream that Reale never thought would be possible.

“This has been amazing,” Reale’s son Nick said. “How could you ask for anything more?”

Mandy Bell is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York.


New York Yankees